Volunteers Around the World Build Surveillance-Free Cellular Network Called ‘Sopranica’

dmoberhaus writes: Motherboard’s Daniel Oberhaus spoke to Denver Gingerich, the programmer behind Sopranica, a DIY, community-oriented mobile phone community. “Sopranica is a undertaking meant to exchange all features of the current mobile phone community with their freedom-respecting equivalents,” says Gingerich. “Taking out all the basement firmware on the cellphone, the towers that track your location, the payment methods that track who you are and who owns the number, and replacing it so we can have the same functionality without having to give up all the privacy that we have to give up right now. At a high level, it’s about running community networks instead of having companies control the cell towers that we connect to.” Motherboard interviews Gingerich and reveals you find out how to use the community to keep away from cell surveillance. According to Motherboard, all you should do to hitch Sopranica is “create a free and anonymous Jabber ID, which is like an email address.” Jabber is slang for a safe prompt messaging protocol known as XMPP that permit’s you talk over voice and textual content from an nameless cellphone quantity. “Next, you need to install a Jabber app on your phone,” studies Motherboard. “You’ll also need to install a Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) app, which allows your phone to make calls and send texts over the internet instead of the regular cellular network.” Lastly, you should get your cellphone quantity, which you are able to do by navigating to Sopranica’s JMP web site. (JMP is the code, which was revealed by Gingerich in January, and “first part of Sopranica.”) “These phone numbers are generated by Sopranica’s Voice Over IP (VOIP) provider which provides talk and text services over the internet. Click whichever number you want to be your new number on the Sopranica network and enter your Jabber ID. A confirmation code should be sent to your phone and will appear in your Jabber app.” As for the way JMP protects in opposition to surveillance, Gingerich says, “If you’re communicating with someone using your JMP number, your cell carrier doesn’t actually know what your JMP number is because that’s going over data and it’s encrypted. So they don’t know that that communication is happening.”

Source hyperlink

Leave a Reply

Ad Blocker Detected

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors. Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.

Refresh